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#1( WEEK 2)- List the reasons you chose to attend college with a 1page essay. #2(WEEK 2)- Read “My Military Service: A Positive Factor in My Life and Career” from the attached document.   Consider the following question:  If you were to create the story of how you became educated, what is one key moment that stands out and how did that impact you? Write a 175 word narrative in which you share your own story, scenario, or example of becoming educated. Use one of the APA style. Apply what you know from the text about narrative writing. Your narrative should: Provide descriptive details Engage the audience Detail your visualization of the story or scenario #3 (WEEK 3)- What is your proposed thesis statement for the attached article entitled PARENTS SOCIAL MEDIA HABITS, and what evidence could you include to support your statement? Respond in 100 words. #4 (WEEK 3)- Recount your greatest success or mistake and what you learned from it in a 1page essay. #5 (WEEK 3)- Write a 175 word reading response on the attached article HOW SOCIAL MEDIA ENDANGERS KNOWLEDGE. Consider the following questions: What is your opinion about the reading? Do you agree or disagree with the author’s perspective? What are one to two reasons that support your opinion? What is your thesis statement? Include the following: An introduction of the article, including the author’s name Brief summary of the article Justification of your opinion (this is your thesis). Reviewing the Thesis Writing section in this week’s Learning Activities will help you build your thesis statement. Connection of your topic to life, work/school, or current event APA citations created by using an example in the reading or by using the Reference and Citation generator from the CWE.
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22…………………………..Career Development Network JOURNAL ………………..Winter 2017-2018 MY MILITARY SERVICE: A Positive Factor in My Life and Career by Neil Carey Military service, for me, has been a very positive and important part of my life/career . Four years of service in the U. S. Air Force during the Korean War gave me the opportunity to serve my country; acquire and strengthen a variety of social, technical and leadership skills; travel and interact with people in different parts of the U. S and the world; and increase my education in order to pursue a career in education and counseling. After growing up on a farm and graduating from a small high school in a graduating class of 10 in the rural Eastern Shore region of Maryland, an uncle and my parents encouraged me to continue my education at the nearby Salisbury State Teachers College. While my high school education and related activities enabled me to do well academically and socially at the college, I had no career goals, did not see myself as a teacher, so I dropped out of college after my first year. Since I clearly did not want to return to the farm, another uncle helped me obtain a position as a life underwriter with a local insurance company. Soon after completing the required registration for the draft, I discussed military options with one my insurance clients, the Army/Air Force recruiter for the area. He encouraged me to consider the possibility of flight training with the U. S. Air Force and offered to arrange for me to take the ASVAB test battery which I did. I did quite well on the test, and after announcing my decision to my parents, enlisted for four years with the U. S. Air Force. I was assigned to basic training at Lackland AFB in San Antonio, TX. While my defective hearing kept me from flight training, after completing basic training, I was able to secure a position in the orderly room (headquarters) of a navigator training squadron at Ellington AFB in Houston, TX. My duties included person – nel file management and payroll processing. Houston’s proximity to Galveston Beach and New Orleans provided a wide range of social and cultural opportunities and experiences. After several months at Ellington, I volunteered for an overseas assignment, expecting to be as – signed to Japan or Korea in the Far East sector. Instead, I was assigned to the European sector and proceeded by troop ship to Southampton, England. At the nearby processing center I was approached by the First Sergeant who asked me to accept an assignment as his assistant in the center’s headquarters. When I expressed my desire to be assigned to the Third Air Force Headquarters in London in order to continue my college education with the University of Maryland Overseas program, he countered with a commitment to obtain a similar program for the center, and to assure my promotions on schedule. I then agreed to accept the assignment at the Processing Center. Chapter 4 Winter 2017-2018…………………………Career Development Network JOURNAL …………………………23 My orientation included the information that the pub in the nearby village of Shaftesbury was the social activity and political discourse for the community. I quickly adjusted to drinking warm beer, acquired a taste for ‘alf and ‘alf, and learned to play darts. The pub patrons were very welcoming to American military, and often expressed their appreciation for American support for the British during World War II. At one point a couple of buddies from the base and I were relaxing in the pub and one of the patrons asked us about our plans for the approaching Christmas holiday. When we hesitated, he insisted that we join his family for Christmas dinner. Because we knew that the English were still dealing with food rationing, we agreed only if we could contribute some food for the meal. We brought coffee, canned goods, sugar and a bottle of Jack Daniels. We had a great time. After dinner and toasts of JD, we joined our host family and went caroling in the village. Fortunately, the English celebrate the day after Christmas as Boxing Day, which enabled us to extend our celebration and strengthen our friendship with our gracious English hosts. In addition to the usual payroll and administrative duties, I was assigned to the team which greeted arriving American service personnel at the Port of Southampton. During the bus ride to the base, we would begin an orientation to service in Great Britain, which included information about the British culture and differences in American English and English dialects including Cockney and Oxford English. Soon after getting settled in my assignment, I received word that a representative of the University of Maryland Overseas program would be on base to register for courses. I immediately signed up for a course in American History. The course was taught by an Oxford professor who was very skillful, interesting and with a good sense of humor. I believe he occasionally referred to “the colonies” to check our attentiveness. I also had the opportunity to take an advanced course in French from a visiting professor who was a resident of Paris. I discovered that my three years of high school French gave me an excellent foundation in the language to build on. During my three years in England, I was able to complete coursework credits equivalent to a second year of college. Midway in my three year tour in England and soon after I had been promoted to staf f sergeant, I received a call from the Captain in charge of the base officers club who asked me if I would consider becoming the office manager for the club. After visiting the club and sampling the club cuisine, I agreed to the assignment change. The club included a dining room, a bar and an adjoining room for a couple of card tables and several slot machines. The staff included an English head waiter, bartender and maintenance staff. The cooks were American airmen. In addition to my administrative duties, I received training in maintaining the slot machines, including how to establish the odds for the payoffs. Unfortunately, a few months later, it was obvious that the Captain, who had been a decorated B-17 pilot during WWII, had a drinking problem which was increasing in severity. As a result, I assumed additional responsibilities of supervising the staff and managing club events. Every two or three weeks, the processing center staff would receive incoming groups of 40 to 50 officers and their dependents or similar groups returning to the U. S. Processing the incoming or outgoing groups would require two to three long, intensive days. Afterwards, staff involved would be given two to four days off. As a member of the processing staff, this time off gave me the opportunity to go to London, Bristol or 24…………………………..Career Development Network JOURNAL ………………..Winter 2017-2018 Bath to explore the rich English history, culture and entertainment. English young ladies were especially interested in American service personnel, and tea dances and concerts provided oppor – tunities to meet and date them. Fortunately, I had additional opportunities to travel to and explore the British Isles and Europe, and to participate in or observe significant social and cultural events including the coronation of Queen Elizabeth and the Chelsea Arts Ball. Our base had an auxiliary facility in Prestwick, Scotland and my occasional official visits there permitted side visits to Glasgow and Edinbur gh. Ireland and Wales were accessible by train and ferry. I would also go to the U. S. Air Force base near London and get plane hops to U. S. bases in France and Germany . Visits to Germany were especially interesting to observe the German acceptance of American direction in re-structuring their government and American assistance in re-building their cities devastated by war. After approximately two and a half years in England, I became aware of an air Force policy which permitted service personnel to receive an early discharge in order to pursue college or technical training. In earlier correspondence, two cousins who were successful in education and who I respected, encouraged me to consider a career in education. With this option in mind, I immediately applied for re-admission to Salisbury State College (STC) and was accepted. I submitted this acceptance, and was granted an early release from my four year enlistment. I returned to the United States, again by troop ship, received an honorable dischar ge and registered at STC. My junior and senior years at STC were interesting and successful. Fellow students and faculty recognized and respected my experience and perspective gained through my military service. My adviser encouraged me to focus on secondary education at the junior high school level, and my course work and practice teaching assignments provided excellent preparation for my teaching career. My adviser also encouraged me to consider graduate work. Since the nearest graduate programs in education were some distance from the Eastern Shore in Baltimore or College Park, I needed to consider teaching options in the Baltimore or Washington area. Fortunately, once again, my educator cousins were helpful, and I applied for and was employed as a junior high math/science teacher in Baltimore County, MD. At the same time, I applied for and was accepted in the University of Maryland graduate program in secondary education curriculum and administration. Fortunately my GI Bill benefits provided good financial support for my graduate studies. My education career started well, reinforced by my military experience. After my second suc- cessful year as a math/science teacher, I was promoted to department chair; I met my future wife; and I received my Master of Education degree from the University of Maryland. A few years later I was recruited by the Maryland State Education Department for the position of supervisor of vocational guidance. In that position, I worked with school counselors and military recruiters to provide students with information about military career options. When I was promoted to the position of state coordinator of career education, the military services became key supporters of that program. When I became the first executive director of the National Career Development Association, conducting a national conference was one of the Association’s goals. The leadership and management skills that I first learned during my military service and my network Winter 2017-2018…………………………Career Development Network JOURNAL …………………………25 of military service contacts were major contributors to the successful achievement of that goal. My military service – including access to the University of Maryland Overseas Program and the GI Bill benefits – has served me well throughout my career in education and counseling. Early on, it provided me with direction, discipline, leadership skills, travel, education and networking opportunities, plus financial support for further education. As a result of my own experience, I have been an enthusiastic advocate for military or community service for all Americans, and benefits, including further education and career support, for veterans. About the author E. Niel Carey, MEd, NCC, NCCC, is Executive Director Emeritus of the National Career Development Association Copyright ofCareer Planning &Adult Development Journalisthe property ofCareer Planning &Adult Development Networkanditscontent maynotbecopied oremailed to multiple sitesorposted toalistserv without thecopyright holder’sexpresswrittenpermission. However, usersmayprint, download, oremail articles forindividual use.
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Stacey Steinberg July 31, 2017 Washingtonpost.com The Washington Post Article 1,103 words (Level 4) 1140LFull Text: Byline: Stacey SteinbergMy friend Lindsay was packing the next day’s lunches when she noticed her son Cole’s phone vibrating on the kitchen counter.Curious to see who was texting him so late, she picked up the phone and entered the password. Like most middle school parents,Lindsay had told Cole that she would occasionally check his phone. She wasn’t snooping, she told herself, she was simply doingwhat any concerned mother would do.What she saw was disturbing. The text was an angry message from Cole’s best friend’s older sister, Becky. As Lindsay looked backthrough Cole’s messages, she saw why Becky was so upset. She opened Instagram on Cole’s phone, where he had posted a pictureof Becky, one of his closest friends, in her bathing suit, bending over to pick something up. It wasn’t a flattering image, and by thelooks of the picture, Becky did not know that her photograph had been taken. The photo had garnered many comments, most ofwhich made fun of Becky’s appearance.Obviously, my friend was not happy, and she knew she had to do something. Our children rely on parents to help them understandhow to navigate relationships in both the real world and online. “Tweens and teens are stuck between wanting to be seen/liked, andunderstanding the impact of actions,” says Jennifer Sager, a psychologist in Gainesville, Fla. Children are going through tremendousinner confusion with regard to what they know they should do and what they think their friends want them to do. “An electronic share,’thumbs up,’ or in many cases, ‘thumbs down,’ is a placeholder for real self-esteem.”So was Cole’s post simply an example of the impulsive and irrational teenage behavior Sager describes? Or was it something he haslearned? As Lindsay stared at her son’s phone, she couldn’t help but recall the many times she’d posted pictures of him doingembarrassing things. Many of the pictures and stories were shared before Cole even knew what Facebook was. But as Cole gotolder, the sharing continued. He occasionally saw the pictures and seemed embarrassed, but he rarely asked his mother to takethem down. Lindsay wondered if he ever felt empowered enough to do so. She was concerned that her own sharing had somehowinfluenced the habits Cole was developing.Many of today’s young teens were born in an era before social media. By the time they entered preschool, most of their parents hadFacebook accounts. And many parents — new to social media — excitedly shared their children’s personal and embarrassing stories. Ihave written in the past about how parents must consider the effect this sharing has on a child’s psychological development. Childrenmodel the behavior of their parents, and when parents constantly share personal details about their children’s lives, and then monitortheir posts for likes and followers, children take note. While most parents have their children’s best interests at heart when they sharepersonal stories on social media, there is little guidance to help them navigate parenting in the digital age.Children are constantly absorbing messages from many sources, including parents. They mimic these observed behaviors inadolescence and adulthood. It is quite possible that parental (over) sharing has taught children that sharing another person’spersonal pictures and stories is expected and appropriate. Indeed, many children spent their elementary school years with littlerecourse to their parents’ online sharing.Parents can help their children better understand the implications of nonconsensual online sharing even if they’ve shared about theirchildren in the past. One powerful way to do this is to offer their older children the opportunity delete posts that cause embarrassmentor shame. Before sharing any future posts about their children, parents can ask permission. This can help teens understand thepower and the importance of controlling one’s own digital footprint. In turn, this helps teens understand why it is critical that they, too,obtain consent before adding to, or altering, the digital footprints of others. After we spoke, Lindsay had a conversation with her son. While he quickly deleted the picture from his Instagram feed, much of thedamage had already been done, causing hurt and embarrassment to Becky. To help Cole understand, Lindsay pulled up her ownFacebook posts, many photos featuring Cole as a very young child. She watched as he processed each picture. While there wassome laughter, she could tell Cole was also surprised by many of her disclosures. They talked about the importance of controllingone’s own digital footprint. To that end, Lindsay offered to delete posts that Cole found embarrassing or inappropriate. After reflectingon the conversation with his mom, Cole offered a sincere apologize to Becky. He knew she still had a right to be angry, but he hopedthat by taking responsibility for his actions, they could start to make amends.I, like Lindsay, share pictures of my children online. I try to do so responsibly and to consider the best practices I’ve gleaned from myresearch. Perhaps most importantly, I no longer post pictures of my oldest child without asking him first. While I’ve spent yearsexploring this issue as an academic and as a mother, I still find it difficult to balance my drive to share my story while still protectingmy children’s privacy. It is too early to know how my own social media sharing practices will one day affect my children’s onlinesharing habits. I can only hope that by being thoughtful before pressing share on social media, I am instilling in my children theimportance of doing the same on their own social media feeds.We are only beginning to develop road maps to guide us as we build communities and expand our lives through social media. As weexplore the competing issues of protecting privacy and curating our lives online, it might be time to rethink our habits and reset themessage, to teach our children the importance of consent and help them become responsible communicators and upstanding onlinecitizens.Stacey Steinberg is a legal skills professor at the University of Florida Levin College of Law where she also serves as an associatedirector of the Center on Children and Families. She is former child abuse prosecutor and child welfare attorney. You can visit herwebsite or find her on Facebook and Twitter.Follow On Parenting on Facebook for more essays, news and updates. You can sign up here for our weekly newsletter and follow uson Twitter @OnParenting.More reading:Why I stopped writing about my childrenParenting in the Facebook age: Should we rethink how we share? COPYRIGHT 2017 The Washington Post (MLA 8th Edition)    Steinberg, Stacey. “Parents’ social media habits are teaching children the wrong lessons.” , 31 July 2017. , https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A499644104/OVIC?u=uphoenix&sid=OVIC&xid=aace803f.Accessed 31 Aug. 2020. GALE|A499644104
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Hossein Derakhshan 2018 Gale Opposing Viewpoints Online Collection Gale, a Cengage Company Viewpoint essay 1,319 words (Level 5) 1310LFull Text:  Instead of a quest for knowledge, [social media] engages us in an endless zest for instant approval from an audience, for whichwe are constantly but unconsciously performing.Hossein Derakshan, also known as Hoder, is an Iranian-Canadian journalist and free speech advocate, encouraging citizenjournalists to use blogs and podcasts to share news. In the following viewpoint, Derakhshan argues that the rise of social mediaportends a fundamental shift in how humans acquire and encounter knowledge. The author links the origins of Wikipedia to theambitions of the Islamic Golden Age, the European Enlightenment, and the Tang dynasty in China, periods during which scholarssought to catalogue all the world s knowledge. Since those early quests to create comprehensive encyclopedias, the authormaintains, several developments, including television and the Internet, have shifted the way humans learn and interpret knowledge.Examining how the Internet has impacted the mission to consolidate and disseminate knowledge, the author identifies a shift fromtext-based traditional media to image- and video-based social media. He asserts that social media has changed online activity froman informative experience to an emotional one that threatens the value and meaning of knowledge and truth.As you read, consider the following questions: According to the author, how did television change the way Americans experience knowledge?1. How does the author use the theories of Neil Postman to support his argument that social media threatens knowledge, and do2. you find them persuasive? Explain your answer.In your opinion, how could the intellectual shifts that the author credits to television and social media benefit humanity, if at all?3.Wikipedia, one of the last remaining pillars of the open and decentralized web, is in existential crisis.This has nothing to do with money. A couple of years ago, the site launched a panicky fundraising campaign, but ironically thanks toDonald Trump, Wikipedia has never been as wealthy or well-organized. American liberals, worried that Trump s rise threatenedthe country s foundational Enlightenment ideals, kicked in a significant flow of funds that has stabilized the nonprofit s balancesheet.That happy news masks a more concerning problem a flattening growth rate in the number of contributors to the website. It isanother troubling sign of a general trend around the world: The very idea of knowledge itself is in danger.The idea behind Wikipedia like all encyclopedias before it has been to collect the entirety of human knowledge. It s a goalthat extends back to the Islamic Golden Age, when numerous scholars inspired by Muhammad s famous verdict of Seekknowledge, even from China set themselves to collecting and documenting all existing information on a wide variety of topics,including translations from Greek, Persian, Syrian, and Indian into Arabic. In the 9th century, a Persian scholar named Ibn Qutaybahcollected the first true encyclopedia, 10 books on power, war, nobility, character, learning and eloquence, asceticism, friendship,prayers, food, and women. He was followed a century later by another Persian scholar, al-Khw rizm Ä« who, in addition to inventingalgebra, produced an encyclopedia covering what he called indigenous knowledge (jurisprudence, scholastic philosophy, grammar,secretarial duties, prosody and poetic art, history) and foreign knowledge (philosophy, logic, medicine, arithmetic, geometry,astronomy, music, mechanics, alchemy). The Chinese had their own encyclopedia dating back to the 7th century.In Europe, the quest to compile a modern encyclopedia started with the Enlightenment in the 18th century. (Immanuel Kant coined afitting Latin motto for the movement: Sapere aude, or Dare to know. ) French Enlightenment thinkers like FrancisBacon and Denis Diderot began compiling ambitious encyclopedias, inspiring others throughout France, Germany, England,Switzerland and the Netherlands. The religious ruling class s discomfort with the effort only helped its financial feasibility; there was an obvious market for these massive collections, often published in numerous volumes, for an increasingly secular middle-class.The first volume of Encycopedie was sold in 1751 to 2,000 subscribers, who would go on to receive the entire twenty-eight-volumeset. Notable revolutionary thinkers such as Voltaire, Rousseau, and Montesquieu were involved in the editing of the work and severaleven ended up in prison. Only 17 years after the publication of the last volume in 1772, the French revolution began, leading toperhaps the most secular state in human history.That trend toward rationality and enlightenment was endangered long before the advent of the Internet. As Neil Postman noted in his1985 book , the rise of television introduced not just a new medium but a new discourse: a gradual shiftfrom a typographic culture to a photographic one, which in turn meant a shift from rationality to emotions, exposition to entertainment.In an image-centered and pleasure-driven world, Postman noted, there is no place for rational thinking, because you simply cannotthink with images. It is text that enables us to uncover lies, confusions and overgeneralizations, to detect abuses of logic andcommon sense. It also means to weigh ideas, to compare and contrast assertions, to connect one generalization to another.The dominance of television was not contained to our living rooms. It overturned all of those habits of mind, fundamentally changingour experience of the world, affecting the conduct of politics, religion, business, and culture. It reduced many aspects of modern life toentertainment, sensationalism, and commerce. Americans don t talk to each other, we entertain each other, Postmanwrote. They don t exchange ideas, they exchange images. They do not argue with propositions; they argue with good looks,celebrities and commercials.At first, the Internet seemed to push against this trend. When it emerged towards the end of the 80s as a purely text-based medium, itwas seen as a tool to pursue knowledge, not pleasure. Reason and thought were most valued in this garden all derived from theproject of Enlightenment. Universities around the world were among the first to connect to this new medium, which hosted discussiongroups, informative personal or group blogs, electronic magazines, and academic mailing lists and forums. It was an intellectualproject, not about commerce or control, created in a scientific research center in Switzerland.Wikipedia was a fruit of this garden. So was Google search and its text-based advertising model. And so were blogs, which valuedtext, hypertext (links), knowledge, and literature. They effectively democratized the ability to contribute to the global corpus ofknowledge. For more than a decade, the web created an alternative space that threatened television s grip on society.Social networks, though, have since colonized the web for television s values. From Facebook to Instagram, the mediumrefocuses our attention on videos and images, rewarding emotional appeals like buttons over rational ones. Instead of aquest for knowledge, it engages us in an endless zest for instant approval from an audience, for which we are constantly butunconsciously performing. (It s telling that, while Google began life as a PhD thesis, Facebook started as a tool to judgeclassmates appearances.) It reduces our curiosity by showing us exactly what we already want and think, based on our profilesand preferences. Enlightenment s motto of Dare to know has become Dare not to care to know.It is a development that further proves the words of French philosopher Guy Debord, who wrote that, if pre-capitalism was about being , and capitalism about having , in late-capitalism what matters is only appearing appearing rich, happy,thoughtful, cool and cosmopolitan. It s hard to open Instagram without being struck by the accuracy of his diagnosis.Now the challenge is to save Wikipedia and its promise of a free and open collection of all human knowledge amid the conquest ofnew and old television how to collect and preserve knowledge when nobody cares to know. Television has even infectedWikipedia itself today many of the most popular entries tend to revolve around television series or their cast.This doesn t mean it is time to give up. But we need to understand that the decline of the web and thereby of the Wikipedia is partof a much larger civilizational shift which has just started to unfold. COPYRIGHT 2020 Gale, a Cengage Company (MLA 8th Edition)    Derakhshan, Hossein. “How Social Media Endangers Knowledge.” , Gale, 2020. ,https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/CNTOSB239540016/OVIC?u=uphoenix&sid=OVIC&xid=da295922. Accessed 31 Aug. 2020.Originally published as “How Social Media Endangers Knowledge,” , 19 Oct. 2017. GALE|CNTOSB239540016

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